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Making a Memory Book

by Louise | November 25th, 2011 | Elementary, Teen Perspective
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A memory book is a scrapbook for memories. The memories can be in the form of pictures or words, or a combination of the two. When I was in 6th grade, every student in my class was required to create a memory book that would be a record of our elementary school years and a snapshot of where we were in life so far. I remember thinking, why would I ever forget what happened in first or second grade or forget what I was thinking about now? Eight years later, that thought is one of the only ones I can specifically remember thinking about in 6th grade, and you can guess how much I remember about 1st or 2nd grade.

The only memories I have from my elementary school days are ones that I’ve reinforced since then by telling the story to others — and the ones in my memory book. Some people are able to record their memories in the form of a diary. I tried many times, but the attempts never amounted to much. Having to make a memory book as a school assignment was extremely useful.

Putting aside time to help your child make a memory book is probably one of the best decisions you can make. Even if your children show no interest in making one at first, keep pushing the idea (which is something I would never suggest for anything else); they will thank you later. If I had made a memory book on my own, the result would have been a stapled stack of flimsy papers, which would’ve stuck together because of my poor gluing skills. Instead, because of the help of adult volunteers, I have a spiral-bound book with laminated pages, guaranteed to last a lifetime of use. Here are a few ideas for pages to include in a memory book:

  • Timeline. Mine includes school photos from each year.
  • Letters. Have them write to a friend, favorite teacher, or to you, their parents.
  • If I Were in Charge of The World I Would
  • In 10 Years I Picture Myself
  • My Favorite Memory is When …
  • Family Tree
  • What I Like/What I Dislike
  • Bio Poem

The memory book can also include a folder that contains small memorabilia. I love looking at my memory book. It’s fun to compare what I liked or disliked then to my current preferences. I truly enjoy reading the letter I wrote to my best friend at the time and seeing what she meant to me. I also get a kick out of seeing my first grade report card.

Working with your child to create a memory book can be a great bonding experience that will have a lasting, tangible result.

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