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Build Elementary Communication Skills

by Joe Lawrence | August 26th, 2015 | Communication, Elementary
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elementary girl smiling (400x400)Communication is the biggest problem in any organization. Elementary-aged children and parents are no exception to this. With some simple guidelines, you can eliminate most communication barriers.

Ask any CEO or General and they will tell the importance of communication and the dangers of barriers to communication. In our workplaces we see this all the time. Someone sends an email that is misunderstood and tempers begin to flare. We have the same issues in our homes too. Most of the fights between my wife and me are because our channels of communication became crossed.

Communication with our school dwellers is vital. We need to help them become better students and more productive members of society. Also, we need to ensure they know how to tell us the important things we need to know.

Basic rules of communication are to know your audience, send the message, and seek feedback as to whether the message was received:

Know your audience: who are you communicating with? Is your child talking to the teacher? If so, they need to learn the proper level of tact. Just because they disagree with the homework or the grade, does not give them the right to blow up on her (parents, this includes you too). Let’s teach them to control their emotions and to articulate their feelings in a logical manner.

Then it is time to send the message: “I see that I missed number three. The answer I chose was ‘b’ and I got this because of the way you taught us in class. Why did I get this wrong?” This was a respectful way to share feelings and still stand up for what he thinks is right.

Seek feedback: The last part of the message sent should be a question that seeks input. We want to know the message is received in the manner in which we intended. I usually have my kindergartner repeat back to me what I just told her or ask her a detailed question about something.

These things can be worked on with our children daily. For example, have them defend their homework assignment to you. Ask them where they came up with Columbus as the capital of Ohio. This teaches them to be ready to defend their opinions and not just make up random facts like we see daily in friends’ Facebook posts.

Communication is very important in any organization and in any home. We need to start early with building our children’s communication skills. By doing this, we will rocket them passed their peers.

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