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Bakugan

by Ronald A. Rowe | March 19th, 2010 | Product reviews
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The latest in the string of card games that my son has brought home is Bakugan. Really, to call it a card game does it somewhat of an injustice. Bakugan is, well, a different thing altogether.

The Bakugan themselves are little colored spheres, the size of a big aggie, or a giant gobstopper. (Wow, I managed to date myself with two references in a single sentence.) The Bakugan have a little magnet embedded somewhere in the sphere.

The first object of the game (there are several) is to roll your round little Bakugan across the playing area and onto one of the metal “gate” cards. If the magnet contacts the metal, the sphere springs open to reveal a little mechanical monster ready for battle. When each player has a Bakugan on one card, the contest begins in earnest.

The battles consist of comparing the relative point values of the twoBakugan, which can be modified by the particular gate card and/orone or more ability cards. That’s really it. Theplayer with the biggest number wins.

Thedesign of the Bakugan is really quite clever.It is fun to watch them pop opento reveal thecreature within. The game itself issecondary todiscovering, collecting, and displaying the little spheroids.Thepiecesrun from $4 – $10 each retail, depending on the point values and rarity of the character. There are also traps, which are notspherical and run a little more.You can save a little money by going online.Bakugan areabundant on Ebay.

As a side note, there is also aBakugan cartoon, which I would not recommend for anyone. It’s choppy,annoying, andlittle more than a barely-concealedinfomercial for the toys. While I’d say’yes’ to the game, it is a big ‘no’ to the cartoon in my house.

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